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We’ve Moved!

hMoved

Hello WNBA-ers. Our new blog site is up and running. So, head over to the new site to catch up on the latest member news and events for the WNBA-NYC. Be sure to subscribe to the blog so you don’t miss anything.

Find us at wnba-nyc.org/blog

The Corner Bookstore

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1313 Madison Avenue
6:00 – 8:00pm

first_affair_cover_imageEmma McLaughlin & Nicola Kraus read from their latest The First Affair

September 16, 2013

Emma McLaughlin and Nicola Kraus are the New York Times bestselling authors of The Nanny Diaries, Citizen Girl, Dedication, Nanny Returns, and their young adult novels, The Real Real and Over You. They work together in New York City. For more information visit EmmaAndNicola.com.”

Ann Fensterstock reads from her debut Art on the BlockArt-on-the-Block

September 17, 2013

“A fascinating tour of the last five decades of contemporary art in New York City, showing how artists are catalysts of gentrification and how neighborhoods in turn shape their art—with special insights into the work of artists such as Jean-Michel Basquiat, Cindy Sherman, and Jeff Koons.”

In Conversation: Ruth Ozeki and Carole DeSanti

DesantiOzeki

Wednesday, September 18, 2013
6:00-8:00 pm
Reflections Yoga Studio
250 West 49th St., 2nd floor

We open our program season with a provocative dialogue between two intriguing authors – both WNBA members – with topics ranging from their latest books, their inspirations, and how women authors fare in today’s publishing world.

Ruth Ozeki is the author of the recently Man Booker-nominated A Tale for the Time Being. She is a novelist, filmmaker, and Zen Buddhist priest.  Carole DeSanti is the author of The Unruly Passions of Eugenie R. As an editor at Penguin, she champions independent voices in women’s fiction.

Light refreshments will be served.

RSVP to: programs@wnba-nyc.org

shenkmanHarriet Shenkman, Ph.D. is a Professor Emerita at City University of New York.  She serves on the Advisory Board of the Women’s National Book Association, NYC.  She was awarded second place in poetry in the Women’s National Book Association National Writing Contest, 2013.  She is proud to serve as Poet-in-Residence at Boomer Cafe and to have a poetry page on Verse Wrights.  Her poems have been published in a number of publications and she is working on a poetry collection, Sweet and Sour Soup.  She is also completing a novel entitled The Camel Tamer.  She lives in New York with her husband Jerry and they have three children.

How long have you been a member of the WNBA-NYC? How did you get involved with the organization?

I have been in the New York chapter of WNBA for several years.  Last year I became the Academic Liaison on the Board.  This was a suitable position as I am Professor Emerita at CUNY and was director of a literary arts center within my college.  I am excited about our new partnership with the NYU Creative Writing Program and we hope to launch our first joint event in March of 2014.

Congratulations on “Mirror, Mirror” placing in the First Annual WNBA Writing Contest! What was the experience like? Will you enter next year’s contest?

It is an honor to win a national award.  It’s very useful in building credibility as a serious writer. I am thrilled to have also just won second place in the 2013 Women Who Write contest for my poem “The Possibility of Teetering.”  It will appear in Calliope 2013: the 20th Anthology. I will also have the opportunity to read it in Louisville, Kentucky at their annual conference.

Where can our members find your other published works?

My latest poem “Fourth Date” will be published in August at Boomer Cafe. Previous poems have been published at When Women Waken, Verse Wrights, Jewish Mag, Jewish Renaissance Magazine, and The WNBA Bookwoman Anthology.  And forthcoming are poems in Third Wednesday, a quarterly journal of poetry, prose and art, and Jewish Currents, a quarterly journal.
Is your background in poetry, or have you written in other genres?

My background is not poetry.  I have written over thirty academic articles and my creative writing began with novel writing.  However, I find satisfaction in the briefer form of poetry to express what I want to say.  You work at getting at the essence of things

From where do you draw inspiration for your writing?

For my poetry, I may start with an image or an experience that is startling or exceptional in some way.  And then I explore it, what it means, and how to capture its essence in words. For my novel, I have characters in my head that I want to see interacting in a challenging context. I am also passionate about situations in the world I want to reveal and explore.

How different is the publishing process for poetry? More or less difficult?

Publishing poetry in the mainstream press is difficult. Agents and editors are more interested in novels and nonfiction.  But my poetry is very accessible and I hold the position of Poet-in-Residence at Boomer Cafe.   I want to put together a collection of verse called Sweet and Sour Soup for the Over Fifty Soul.  There is a huge market for readers in the baby boomer generation and older that has not be tapped.

Do you have any projects currently in the works?

I also have a novel in the works called The Camel Tamer.  I am working on revisions.  You could say it is a hunt for a terrorist narrative within a coming of age story.  I am striving for a tragic/comic effect and my two main characters, a hardened Mossad agent and an innocent American kid, are polar opposites.  Most of the story takes place in Jerusalem and other places in Israel.

What’s your favorite word and why?

I do not have a favorite word.  I love to put words together into unique constellations that convey feelings and meaning.  One reader of my poetry said it is provocative without being sentimental.  I like that description.

What are you currently reading? Any great recommendations for our members?

I am reading Ruth Ozeki’s new novel, A Tale for the Time Being, and I am looking forward to hearing her in conversation with Carole DeSanti at the WNBA event in September.  I love the new novel by A.M. Homes, May We Be Forgiven. She is a master at combining darkness and wit.  She won the Women’s Prize for Fiction over several respected women authors.  I would recommend both books.

mcnallyjackson_logo

McNally Jackson
52 Prince St.

Algonquin Young Readers Imprint Launch

September 10, 2013
7:00pm

“Editor and Publisher Elise Howard will introduce Algonquin’s expansion into the young readers market with their debut list of unforgettable characters, brilliant writing, and powerful new voices for the middle grade and young adult reader. Launch list authors Sara Farizan (If You Could Be Mine), Amy Herrick (The Time Fetch), and Hollis Seamon (Somebody Up There Hates You) will be on hand to read from and discuss their new works. Audience Q&A and autographing to follow.”

The White Review: Issue no. 8 launch, with Lauren Elkin, Siri Hustvedt, & Kate Zambreno

September 11, 2013
7:00pm

Lauren Elkin will be joined in conversation by Siri Hustvedt, author of The Summer Without Men, and Living, Thinking, Looking, and Kate Zambreno, author of Heroines and Green Girl, discussing why “writing by women simply isn’t read, received, or written about in the way writing by men is.”

If you attend either of these events and would like to write a guest blog for Feature Friday, please email Tqwana at blog@wnba-nyc.org.

typewriterYour latest manuscript is finally complete. First off – congratulations! Before you move on to hiring a professional editor, take a look at these six tips from HuffPost Books that you can do yourself.

Six Tips for Self-Editing Your Fiction

Kristen Lamb, former editor and author of Rise of the Machines — Human Authors in a Digital World, has this advice for aspiring authors:

“There are many editors who charge by the hour. If they’re spending their time fixing blunders you could’ve easily repaired yourself, you’re burning cash and time. Yet, correct these problems, and editors can more easily get to the meat of your novel. This means you will spend less money and get far higher value.”

What helpful hints would you add to this list? WNBA-ers? Share in the comments.

 

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Happy Monday, WNBA-ers and Happy Labor Day! As you enjoy the last official BBQ day of summer, take time to mark your calendars for our chapter’s upcoming fall events. Be sure to return to the blog for more information as each event approaches.

September

WNBA-NYC Chapter invites members to our annual Networking Party!
Wednesday, September 11
6:00–8:30 pm
(We’ll send the East Side address when we get your RSVP.)

Our fall members party is an opportunity for us to get reacquainted, learn about a new year of programs, and bring along friends interested in joining the association. We have a special treat for paid-up members. We’ll be raffling some very beautiful books at the end of the evening. And we are initiating this fall’s community service project—a book drive for the Kids Research Center. (More about this coming in a separate email.)

Light refreshments will be served.

RSVP to: programs@wnba-nyc.org

In Conversation: Ruth Ozeki and Carole DeSanti
Wednesday, September 18
6:00–8:00 pm
Reflections Yoga Studio
250 West 49th St., 2nd floor

We open our program season with a provocative dialogue between two intriguing authors, both WNBA members—with topics ranging from their latest books, their inspirations, and how women authors fare in today’s publishing world. Ruth Ozeki is the author of the recently Man Booker-nominated A Tale for the Time Being. She is a novelist, filmmaker, and Zen Buddhist priest.   Carole DeSanti is the author of The Unruly Passions of Eugenie R. As an editor at Penguin, she champions independent voices in women’s fiction.

Light refreshments. Book signings.

RSVP to: programs@wnba-nyc.org

Brooklyn Book Festival 2013
Sunday, September 22
10:00 am–6:00 pm
Brooklyn Borough Hall and Plaza
WNBA Booth 390
(Take the 2, 3, 4, 5 to Borough Hall; R to Court Street; or A, C, F to Jay Street/Borough Hall)

Once again, WNBA-NYC chapter will be sharing a booth with the National Reading Group Month folks at the Brooklyn Book Festival. Last year’s event was a great success and we hope to continue the positive experience this year.  We will be distributing our promotional materials to the public and promoting WNBA. We hope to sign up some new members! Join the fun—be a booth volunteer!

From their website – “The Brooklyn Book Festival is the largest free literary event in New York City” www.brooklynbookfestival.org

October

Members Neighborhood Lunch
Wednesday, October 16
12:30–2:00 pm
Scandinavia House, 58 Park Ave. (4 blocks south of Grand Central)

Join fellow members for a networking lunch at one of our favorite locations. Lunches are a great opportunity for new and old members to get acquainted. Bring a friend interested in joining the association.

RSVP to: jmazefsky@aol.com

National Reading Group Month Author Panel
Wednesday, October 23
7:00–9:00 pm
Strand Bookstore, Rare Book Room
12th and Broadway

A celebration of National Reading Group Month and Great Group Reads! Join us for a lively panel discussion with these renowned authors about their latest books and their writing lives—Michèle Forbes, Caroline Leavitt, Bernice McFadden, Roxana Robinson, John Searles, and moderator Elizabeth Nunez.

WNBA members receive free admission PLUS a $15.00 Strand gift card!

Non-members welcome ($15 tickets at the door).

RSVP to: programs@wnba-nyc.org

Light refreshments. Book signings.

November

How I Got the Story: Women Writing Women’s Lives
November 12
7:00–9:00 pm
Pace University, downtown campus, Bianco Room, 1 Pace Plaza

Join panel authors Jean Fagin Yellin, Marnie Mueller, Nancy Rubin Stuart, and Diane Jacobs as they discuss the hows and why of writing biographies. Deirdre Bair, moderator.